Coronavirus travel health

Check the latest information on risk from COVID-19 for Italy on the TravelHealthPro website

See the TravelHealthPro website for further advice on travel abroad and reducing spread of respiratory viruses during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Entry and borders

See Entry requirements to find out what you will need to do when you arrive in Italy.

Return to the UK

Travelling from and returning to the UK

Check what you must do to travel abroad and return to England, Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland.

If you plan to pass through another country to return to the UK, check the travel advice for the country you’re transiting. If you will pass through a red list country, book your hotel quarantine package before travelling to the UK.

You are responsible for organising your own COVID-19 test, in line with UK government testing requirements. You should ensure that the certificate is released in English, French or Spanish. You should contact local authorities for information on testing facilities.

Be prepared for your plans to change

No travel is risk-free during COVID. Countries may further restrict travel or bring in new rules at short notice, for example due to a new COVID-19 variant. Check with your travel company or airline for any transport changes which may delay your journey home.

If you test positive for COVID-19, you may need to stay where you are until you test negative. You may also need to seek treatment there.

Plan ahead and make sure you:

  • can access money
  • understand what your insurance will cover
  • can make arrangements to extend your stay and be away for longer than planned

Public spaces and travel within Italy

Public spaces and services

The following COVID-19 restrictions should be followed:

  • The mandatory use of masks whilst indoors. Children aged 5 and under do not need to wear a mask. You should pay close attention to signage when travelling and carry a mask with you at all times. The use of FFP2 masks is compulsory on public transport, in theatres, concert halls and cinemas and for sporting events until at least 31 March. You cannot consume food or drink in the above indoor locations. From 11 February, the use of masks is no longer mandatory in outdoor spaces, except in places of large gatherings such as sporting events.
  • From 10 January a Super Green Pass is required to access facilities and services in Italy. See ‘Super Green Pass’ below

  • Social distancing of one metre must be observed and gatherings should be avoided

Regional and local authorities in Italy are empowered to adjust these measures where required, which may occur at short notice. You are strongly advised to consult the websites for the regions in which you are travelling for the latest information. Information on regional COVID zones is available on the Ministry of Health website (in English).

Green Pass and Super Green Pass

Green Pass

A “Green Pass” (website only in Italian), also known as an EU digital COVID certificate, certifies vaccination, recovery or negative test result. All travellers aged 12 and above must present a Green Pass or Super Green Pass to board an international flight from Italy. See ‘International Travel from Italy’ below.

You can obtain a Green Pass valid for 48 hours by testing negative to a rapid COVID-19 test available from local pharmacies and test centres. The test provider will print your test results and will email you a unique code. You will then need to access the Government website (in Italian) and enter your details. Select the option ‘Utente senza tessera sanitaria’ (‘User without a health card’). You will be prompted to enter the type and number of the ID you showed when you got your test, as well as the code on your test certificate. Click ‘Ricupera certificazione’ (‘Get certificate’) to download your digital test result.

Children aged 11 and under are exempt from presenting a green pass and Super Green Pass (see below).

Anyone falsifying a certificate is liable to face a fine of up to €3000 or a prison sentence.

Super Green Pass

A Super Green Pass, also known as an EU digital COVID certificate, certifies full vaccination or recovery.

From 10 January until 31 March a Super Green Pass is required to access restaurants, bars, hotels, all local and regional transport services (excluding taxis and international flights) as well as museums, cultural centres, sports facilities and stadiums. A super Green Pass is also needed to access outdoor facilities such as restaurants, swimming pools, wellness centres, ski lifts and to participate in celebrations following civil and religious ceremonies.

Italy will accept the UK’s proof of COVID-19 recovery and vaccination record as the equivalent to a Super Green Pass as long as it is in the form of a verifiable QR code.

Once in Italy, a primary vaccination certificate (demonstrating both doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a one-dose vaccine) serving as a Super Green Pass has a validity of 180 days from the date of the last vaccine. A recovery certificate also has a validity of 180 days from the date of the first positive test. If your primary vaccination certificate expires whilst in Italy, you can continue to access services by taking a Rapid Lateral Flow Test (valid for 48 hours) or PCR test (valid for 72 hours).

The primary vaccination certificate has unlimited validity in Italy for those who have had a booster dose. For those who have recovered from Covid having already completed the primary vaccination cycle (both doses of a two-dose vaccine or one dose of a one-dose vaccine), the recovery certificate has unlimited validity.

Your NHS appointment card from vaccination centres is not designed to be used as proof of vaccination and should not be used to demonstrate your vaccine status. All UK recovery certificates must be accompanied by a sworn translation.

Super Green Pass plus booster

From 30 December until at least 31 March, visiting care homes and hospices is only permitted if you hold a Super Green Pass, and have had a negative COVID19 test or show that you have received a third (booster) dose of the vaccination

Travelling within Italy

From 10 January, you will need a Super Green Pass to access hotels and to travel on local transport including the metro, trains, buses and domestic flights. See Green Pass and Super Green Pass above.

You must comply with the local travel regulations of the region you are visiting, even if you have only just arrived in Italy. Public transport links may be less frequent and seating limited to comply with social distancing measures. FFP2 masks must be worn on public transport.

More information on all these requirements is available from the Ministry of Health

International travel from Italy

To board an international flight from Italy, all travellers aged 12 and above must be able to show a Green Pass or Super Green Pass. See Green Pass.

If you are unvaccinated, you can obtain a Green Pass by testing negative to a rapid COVID-19 test available from local pharmacies. You must obtain the green pass no earlier than 48 hours prior to your flight departure. See Green Pass.

Wearing masks for flights

From 10 January until 31 March, FFP2 masks or higher grade must be worn to travel on flights in Italy. You should take spare masks for long journeys. Check with your travel operator before travelling.

If you are travelling to the UK, see Return to the UK for additional requirements.

Consult the European Union’s Re-Open EU page for rules on travelling within the EU.

Healthcare in Italy

COVID-19 testing is widely available at private clinics. Rapid testing is also available in many pharmacies, and, in some regions, drive-in testing is available. You are strongly advised to consult the website for the region from which you are travelling as test facilities vary across regions.

Developing symptoms of COVID-19 while in Italy

If you think you have symptoms, including a fever or respiratory difficulties such as shortness of breath or a cough, you should stay in your accommodation and call your regional hotline. Most of the regional hotlines listed have English speaking staff. You can also call your local ASL (Azienda Sanitaria Locale).

If you are staying in a hotel or resort, your accommodation provider may have a list of private doctors that they can call to assess your symptoms and conduct a COVID-19 test.

If you have arranged your own accommodation you can find details of English speaking doctors on our list of healthcare providers.

Remember that an EHIC or GHIC covers state healthcare only, not private treatment. You will be responsible for the cost of any treatment provided by a private doctor or private clinic.

Close contact

If you come into close contact with someone who tests positive, the following rules apply:

If you do not have symptoms AND within the last 120 days have either (a) completed a full course of vaccination OR (b) received a booster, OR (c) recovered from COVID-19, you do not need to self-isolate. However, you must wear a FFP2 mask for 10 days.

If you do not have symptoms AND more than 120 days ago either (a) completed a full course of vaccination OR (b) received a booster, OR (c) recovered from COVID-19, you must self-isolate for 5 days. You must produce a negative PCR or lateral flow test on day 5 to be released from self-isolation.

If you do not have symptoms AND have neither completed a full course of vaccination nor recovered from COVID-19, then you must self-isolate for 10 days. You must produce a negative PCR or lateral flow test on day 10 to be released from self-isolation.

In any case, if you develop symptoms you should take a test when the symptoms occur and, if symptoms remain, test again on the fifth day after being in contact with the positive person.

Local health authorities have now indicated you can test in a private facility. If you do so, you must send a digital copy of your negative test certificate to the local ASL office.

For further details please see Ministry of Health website (only in Italian).

Testing positive for COVID-19 while in Italy

If you are tested and the result is positive, you must immediately self-isolate in your accommodation and call your regional hotline as set out above.

You may be able to remain in your existing accommodation for self-isolation, or be required to transfer into a state hospital or other government-provided accommodation. You may be required to fund accommodation. Depending on local arrangements, travellers in groups may be spread across different accommodation locations.

If within the last 120 days you have either (a) completed a full course of vaccination OR (b) received a booster the self-isolation, you must self-isolate for 7 days. Otherwise, you must self-isolate for 10 days.

In order to be released from self-isolation, you must produce a negative test. The local health authority determines the type of test they will use and the pattern of testing. You will also need to have been symptom-free for at least 3 days.

If you continue to test positive for a variant other than Beta or Omicron, you can be released from self-isolation after 21 days. You will also need to have been symptom-free for at least 7 days.

You should follow the advice of the local health authorities at all times as regional variations may apply.

Local health authorities have now indicated you can test in a private facility. If you do so, you must send a digital copy of your negative test certificate to the local ASL office.

For further details please see Ministry of Health website (only in Italian).

Quarantine hotels

If you test positive for COVID-19 you may be able to remain in your existing accommodation for self-isolation, or be required to transfer into a state hospital or other government-provided accommodation. You may be required to fund accommodation.

Depending on local arrangements, travellers in groups may be required to stay in separate accommodation (e.g. if a sufficient number of rooms is not available in one venue, your group may be spread across different accommodation locations).

The UK government will not cover mandatory quarantine costs for British nationals. EHIC or GHIC cards therefore cannot be used to cover the cost of staying in a quarantine hotel if payment is required. Make sure you have access to funds to cover the costs or take out insurance, checking the policy has adequate cover.

If you have or are entitled to an EHIC or GHIC and you need state healthcare treatment while staying at a quarantine hotel, the UK government will fund treatment as usual through the EHIC/GHIC scheme.

Remember that an EHIC or GHIC does not cover private treatment. You will be responsible for the cost of any treatment provided by a private doctor or hospital.

In some Italian regions, you may be required to take a coronavirus test if you spend 48 hours or two consecutive nights in a hospital for any reason. If you test positive, you will be required to quarantine, as outlined above.

In the case of an emergency you should call Italy’s 112 emergency number. English speaking operators are available.

For contact details for English speaking doctors, visit our list of healthcare providers. Find out more from the NHS website about EHIC and GHIC healthcare cover abroad. For information regarding access to healthcare in Italy see healthcare for UK nationals visiting the EU. Your emotional and mental wellbeing is important. Read guidance on how to look after your mental wellbeing and mental health. View Health for further details on healthcare in Italy. See also the guidance on healthcare if you’re waiting to return to the UK.

COVID-19 vaccines if you live in Italy

Wherever possible British nationals should aim to be vaccinated in the country where they live. We will update this page when the Government of Italy announces new information on the national vaccination programme. You can sign up to get email notifications when this page is updated.

The Italian national vaccination programme started in December 2020 and is using the AstraZeneca, Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines. British nationals resident in Italy are eligible for vaccination. The Italian Medicines Agency (AIFA) has issued comprehensive information, on the vaccine and the documentation required to book an appointment.

Many regional authorities have launched on-line booking platforms and opened call centres for bookings. Regional requirements vary, with booking platforms requiring you to enter the details of your tessera sanitaria (Italian health card), a codice fiscale or STP card. Some regions are now offering a dedicated vaccination service to those not registered with the Italian health system. You should consult the regional health pages where you live.

An interactive map (in Italian) details a list of vaccine administration points by region.

Find out more, including about vaccines that are authorised in the UK or approved by the World Health Organisation, on the COVID-19 vaccines if you live abroad.

If you’re a British national living in Italy, you should seek medical advice from your local healthcare provider. Information about COVID-19 vaccines used in the national programme where you live, including regulatory status, should be available from local authorities.

If you receive your COVID-19 vaccination in Italy, you can get an EU Digital COVID Certificate from the national authorities. The Certificate proves that you have been vaccinated against COVID-19, received a negative test result, or recovered from COVID-19. It will help facilitate your travel within the EU and, in some countries, you can use it to demonstrate your COVID-19 status to businesses and other organisations. For further information visit the European Commission’s EU Digital COVID Certificate page.

Help and support

If you need urgent consular assistance, contact your nearest British embassy, high commission or consulate. All telephone numbers are available 24/7.